Humidity control

Humidity control

In certain manufacturing processes the relative humidity is an important factor. Cotton fibres, for example, must not become too dry, or they become brittle and difficulties arise through electrification by friction. For this reason the British cotton spinning industry came to be established in the damp climate of Lancashire on the west side of the Pennines. In this part of the country moisture-laden winds from the Atlantic are forced upwards over the high ground where the atmospheric pressure is less. In the resulting expansion the air does work, and the energy for this is provided

Humidity control
Humidity control

from the internal energy of the air (see page 201). Consequently, the wind cools and excess moisture is precipitated as rain. In contrast, a dry atmosphere is needed in factories where the assembly of certain electrical components is carried out. This requirement also applies to warehouses for the storage of food and for the seasoning of wood. In such cases special equipment is installed to dry the air and recirculate it through the building.

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