The voltaic pile

The voltaic pile

To support his views Volta constructed a pile of pairs of silver and zinc discs separated by discs of cardboard soaked in brine (Fig. 34.2 ({I)). On touching the top and bottom discs simultaneously he received an electric shock. Further experiments
showed that similar results could be obtained with other metals in conjunction with solutions of various salts and acids. One disadvantage of the voltaic pile was that the weight of the discs squeezed out the liquid from the cardboard so that it ran down the outside and put the pile aut or action. Volta solved this problem by making large numbers of small cells consisting
of strips of zinc and either silver or copper dipping into dilute sulphurie acid. The zinc plate of one cell was then connected by a copper wire to the copper plate of the

The voltaic pile
The voltaic pile

next, and so on, forming what Volta called “a crown of cups” (Fig. 34.2 (b)). owadays we should call it a battery of simple cells. With such a battery consisting of a hundred or more cells, a tingling sensation was felt when the free copper and zinc plates of the end cells were touched simultaneously by the fingers. Volta inferred from this that an electric current flowed from one plate to the other when they were connected through a conductor such as the human body or a metal wire.

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